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Save the Date for 2016 Core Method Workshops November 13, 2015 - Posted By: Michael

black and white zen

The Core Method Workshops in 2016 will be held:

May 4-7 in Chicago at the Godfrey Hotel (this is a change in the previously-announced dates)

September 8-11 in San Francisco

Watch this space for more details and how to register. Signup on the right of this page to receive emails as more information becomes available.

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2015 Three Cores Agenda September 5, 2015 - Posted By: Michael

Thursday

6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Registration and Reception
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm Introducing the 3 Cores—Warrior, Emotional and Logical and the Core Truth

Friday

7:00 am to 8:00 am Breakfast
8:00 am to 10:45 am Meditation for lawyers discussion and practice

Sitting meditation

Walking meditation

10:45 am to 11:00 am Break
11:00 am to noon Mindfulness and practicing law
Noon to 1:00 pm Lunch
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm Learn Aikido and Japanese swordsmanship principles as they apply to trial
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm Break
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm The Warrior Core during discovery, mediation and trial

Embracing the uncertainty of trial

Saturday

7:00 am to 8:00 am Breakfast
8:00 am to 10:45 am Connecting with jurors

Storytelling strategies

10:45 am to 11:00 am Break
11:00 am to noon Expanding vocal range, inflection and expressiveness
Noon to 1:00 pm Lunch
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm Presenting as a person; not a lawyer

Transforming stage fright into stage presence

Invisibly directing where the judge and jurors look

4:00 pm to 6:00 pm Break
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm The Emotional Core during discovery, mediation and trial

Simplifying the case around a Core Truth

Using defense depositions to prove your case

Sunday

8:00 am to 9:00 am Breakfast
9:00 am to noon The Logical Core during discovery, mediation and trial

The key to big damages

Putting it all together—lawyering effectively and compassionately to leave the world a better place

Graduation

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2015 Three Cores Workshop – October 22-25 in Aspen, Colorado September 5, 2015 - Posted By: Michael

Hotel JeromeThe 3 Cores Method is being taught by Michael Leizerman, Joshua Karton and Jay Rinsen Weik and is based upon the skills, practice, training and support that Michael Leizerman has employed to achieve recent notable settlements in the past year of $34 million and $12 million and record-breaking verdicts in the past few years, including consortium verdicts of $13.2 million and $16 million. During the four day working sessions, you will practice how to:

  • Apply mindfulness and meditation practices to all aspects of your case
  • Choose the most persuasive words and stories for your case
  • Prepare your case around a Core Truth
  • Connect emotionally with the jury
  • Embrace the uncertainty of trial
  • Do cool stuff with swords
facultyFaculty Michael Leizerman – Trial Lawyer, Aikido Student William Esper Acting Studio Summer Intensive Graduate Joshua Karton – Actor, Director, Writer and Trial Consultant Jay Rinsen Weik – 5th Degree Black Belt in Aikido, Zen Abbott and TeacherJay with swordson the catamaran reducedJay in robesMichael Leizerman
agendaAgenda Agenda includes practice in applying the following to jury selection, opening, witness examination, closing and other aspects of cases and trials:

  • Aikido and Japanese swordsmanship principles
  • The lawyer’s most important skill – LISTENING
  • Command of voice and body
  • Sitting and walking meditation
  • Usurping defense depositions and themes to prove your case
  • The Three Cores – Warrior, Emotional and Logical

Click here for full agenda.

registrationRegistration Tuition is $1295. To Register contact Lori at lorihenson@sbcglobal.net or call 1-417-844-6860 with credit card information or to arrange to pay by check.

Click here for WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FORM

hotelHotel Accommodations The room rate at the Hotel Jerome is $197 per night. The block is being held until September 25th. Call 800.331.7213 for reservations and mention the 3 Cores Seminar for the discount.

The Hotel Jerome, referred to as the crown jewel of Aspen, recently underwent a complete renovation to restore this 1889 Luxury Silver Boom Era hotel to its prior glory.  It is conveniently located in the heart of Aspen and features the legendary J-Bar, frequented by locals and celebrities alike.

The Jerome was popularized in the writings of Hunter S. Thompson, a transplant to Aspen, was known to stop at the J-Bar when picking up his mail to eat, drink and watch TV as it had the best reception in the area (prior to cable becoming widespread).  Following his death, his memorial service was held in the Hotel’s ballroom.  Travel writers have praised both the Jerome’s luxury accommodations and it’s helpful and friendly staff.  The hotel offers transportation to and from the Aspen airport.

Not sure? Email Michael Leizerman at michael@leizerman.com for substantive information. Email LoriHenson@sbcglobal.net for registration questions.

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3 Cores Agenda at Mohican State Park, October 16 – 19, 2014 September 10, 2014 - Posted By: Michael

The 3 Cores for Lawyers Agenda

Thursday, October 16, 2014
5:00 pm to 7:00 pm Registration and Reception
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm Introducing the 3 Cores—Warrior, Emotional and Logical; Human themes at trial; Listening exercise

Friday, October 17, 2014
7:00 am to 8:00 am Breakfast
8:00 am to 10:45 am Meditation for lawyers discussion and practice: Sitting Meditation; Walking Meditation
10:45 am to 11:00 am Break
11:00 am to noon Mindfulness and practicing law
Noon to 1:00 pm Lunch
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm Learn Aikido and Japanese swordsmanship principles as they apply to trial
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm Break
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm The Warrior Core during discovery, mediation and trial; Embracing the uncertainty of trial

Saturday, October 18, 2014
7:00 am to 8:00 am Breakfast
8:00 am to 10:45 am Connecting with jurors; Storytelling strategies
10:45 am to 11:00 am Break
11:00 am to noon Expanding vocal range, inflection and expressiveness
Noon to 1:00 pm Lunch
1:00 pm to 4:00 pm Acting exercises for lawyers; Controlling stage fright for lawyers; Invisibly directing where the judge and jurors look
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm Break
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm to 10:00 pm The Emotional Core during discovery, mediation and trial; Simplifying the case around a Core Truth; Using defense depositions to prove your case; Damages arguments in closing

Sunday, October 19, 2014
8:00 am to 9:00 am Breakfast
9:00 am to noon The Logical Core during discovery, mediation and trial
Mind mapping your case
Putting it all together—lawyering effectively and compassionately to leave the world a better place

 

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The 3 Cores Method Seminar Thursday, October 16 (7pm) to Sunday, October 19 (noon) September 3, 2014 - Posted By: Michael

3 Cores bannerThe 3 Cores Method is being taught by Michael Leizerman, Joshua Karton and Jay Rinsen Weik and is based upon the skills, practice, training and support that Michael Leizerman has employed to achieve recent notable verdicts, including consortium verdicts of $13.2 million and $16 million. During the four day working sessions, limited to 25 participants, you will practice how to:

  • Apply mindfulness and meditation practices to all aspects of your casetrees
  • Choose the most persuasive words and stories for your case
  • Prepare your case around a Core Truth
  • Connect emotionally with the jury
  • Embrace the uncertainty of trial
  • Do cool stuff with swords
facultyFaculty Michael Leizerman – Trial Lawyer, Aikido Student William Esper Acting Studio Summer Intensive Graduate
Joshua Karton – Actor, Director, Writer and Trial Consultant
Jay Rinsen Weik – 5th Degree Black Belt in Aikido, Zen Priest and Teacherfacultybanner
agendaAgenda

Agenda includes practice in applying the following to jury selection, opening, witness examination, closing and other aspects of cases and trials:

  • Aikido and Japanese swordsmanship principles
  • The lawyer’s most important skill – LISTENING
  • Command of voice and body
  • Sitting and walking meditation
  • Mind mapping the case
  • Usurping defense depositions and themes to prove your case
  • The Three Cores – Warrior, Emotional and Logical

Click here for full agenda.

registrationRegistrationTuition is $980 and includes all meals during the program. To Register contact Angie at angie@leizerman.com or 1-800-628-4500 with credit card information or to arrange to pay by check.
hotelHotel Accommodations The room rate at the Mohican State Park Lodge is $129 per night. The block is being held until September 17th. The fall colors are spectacular during this time, so don’t miss staying in the Lodge. Call 419.938.5411 for reservations and mention the 3 Cores Seminar for the discount.hotelacc

 

 

 

 

If you wish to be paired with another attendee to share a room, contact Angie at 1-800-628-4500.
For updates and additional information visit www.TruthWarrior.com

Angie@Leizerman.com | Michael@Leizerman.com | 1-800-628-4500 www.truthwarrior.com
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Zen, Aikido and lawyering July 21, 2013 - Posted By: Michael

I believe in the Japanese idea of kaizen–continuous improvement. I look forward to a lifetime of study of law, persuasion and becoming a better person. In my personal life, I have studied Aikido–a martial art handed down from the Samurai–and Zen mindfulness and meditation practices.

Martial art training teaches us to center. We center in the hara–the point in the body just an inch below the belly button. Zen training teaches us to focus on our breath. From this place of being centered and focused, we can begin to explore the emotional and logical realities of a case. These basic practices can be very powerful building blocks for courtroom presence and presentation. They have helped me receive record breaking settlements and verdicts.I believe th

Jay Rinsen Weik

Jay Rinsen Weik (a fifth degree Aikdo black belt and an ordained Zen Buddhist priest) has helped me develop exercises specifically for trial lawyers. We are curious if there are enough other lawyers interested in these methods to support an interactive seminar (including swords and meditation) on Zen. Aikido and lawyering..

Please register for more information on this topics by entering your name to the right.

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The Influentials August 12, 2011 - Posted By: Michael

The idea of The Influentials is that critical mass for ideas and products come from one in ten Americans who are “influentials.” A great example of this is the Jones Family in the mediocre-but-thought-provoking movie The Joneses. You can identify Influentials through 11 questions.

These 11 questions have successfully predicted the foreman of my last few juries. The questions are:

How many of you have attended a public meeting on town or school affairs?

How many of you have written or called a politician at a local, state or national level?

How many of you have served on a committee in a local organization?

How many of you were an officer of a club or organization?

How many of you have attended a rally or speech or protest?

How many of you have written to the editor/called a live broadcast to express an opinion?

How many of you were active in a group trying to influence public policy or government?

How many of you have made a speech?

How many of you have worked for a political party?

How many of you have written an article for a magazine or newspaper?

How many of you have held or run for office?

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Improv for the trial lawyer July 27, 2011 - Posted By: Michael

Mike Myers, Rachel Mason, Jimmy Carrane, Andy Dick and Mo Collins                                              (c) used with permission

While it might not seem like a natural combination, I have learned a lot about being a better trial lawyer, and person, from improv. I have done some work informally in groups and with Second City improv instructor Jimmy Carrane.

What does improv have to do with law? When doing improv, you work with your partners and don’t contradict them. Always make your partner look good. This is relevant to trial in jury selection.

One way to do this is an improv exercise called “yes, and…” Whatever somebody else says, you respond “yes, and…” So, if they say “I love to eat pickled mouse brains,” you might respond something like “Yes, and it makes mint chocolate chip ice cream taste even better.” Now, this is a silly example; please don’t read too much into it. And still (notbut but and), it is helpful. If you sweetie says to you “Do you love me?” you’re answer had better not be “yes, but…” We hear yes, but as no.

When a potential juror tells you in jury selection that there are too many frivolous law suits, don’t answer “Yes, but don’t you think that lawsuits make society safer?” That’s fighting with the juror (and just as bad, I think, trying to persuade the juror in jury selection; not because you’re not allowed to persuade, but because you generally can not persuade). Try “Yes, and some people would also say that lawsuits have society safer? How do you feel about that?”  Or even “Yes, and what else can you say about lawsuits?” And get more from that juror or another juror. I prefer to get that juror or another to talk about lawsuits making society safer instead of me volunteering it.

The lesson is to try to remove but from your vocabulary. It gets in the way of creating an emotional connection with a juror, which is the key to persuasion (which will be the subject of my next post.)

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Newest Trial Guides book – Twelve Heroes, One Voice by Carl Bettinger July 24, 2011 - Posted By: Michael

I just finished reading Carl Bettinger’s new book, Twelve Heroes, One Voice. Carl was trained as a doctor, then became a lawyer and now handles medical malpractice and nursing home litigation. First, full disclosure: I love Carl and his contagious enthusiasm for helping people and using sometimes unconventional methods to succeed at trial.  I consider him a friend and mentor. He is the attorney who first turned me onto working with improv instructors (I work with Jimmy Carrane of Second City in Chicago, if anybody’s looking for help in this area.) In this book, Carl quotes liberally from other friends and mentors of mine, such as Josh Karton. I’ve been in rooms with Carl when he’s warming up lawyers with high-energy improv techniques. Inevitably, somebody mumbles something like “does this stuff really work?” And inevitably, somebody else in the room who knows Carl explains that in the last couple years, Carl’s received a $54 million nursing home verdict, then always trying to do improve on the past, received a $54.1 million nursing home verdict a year later. This seems to give him credibility.

So, how is the book? Excellent. At 178 pages, it is concise in its message–the jury is the hero of the trial. You might read through this quickly and miss the gems in this book because they are so simple, but so few lawyers embrace them. And it is the simple that is usually sublime. We can learn a lot from Hollywood screenwriters who know how to hold an audience’s attention. We, as movie viewers, are used to the little guy overcoming the odds and succeeding because the hero steps out of his everyday role and does something extraordinary to make the world a better place. In order to succeed, the hero at trial must be the jury. The beauty of Carl Bettinger’s book is that he takes the reader beyond theory and gives specific examples, including transcript testimony from his cases, of how to do this.

Anybody who’s heard me speak lately has heard me talk about the ideas of story and journey and hero as part of my Fusion idea of trial. Story is one of the 14 ideas that I use to create a case presentation that maximizes the chance of success. Carl recognizes, and I know uses, many of these other ideas as well: Rules of the Road, Reptile, and others. He explains in his book that the idea of Hero is only one part of trial. I believe that it is an essential part, and thank Carl for adding this book to the excellent trial literature currently available at Trial Guides.

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Welcome to my site July 21, 2011 - Posted By: Michael

I am passionate about persuasion and lawyering! I have created this site to share some of the knowledge that has helped me over the years. From Aristotle’s On Rhetoric to the latest in neuroscience, I believe that creating an emotional connection is the key to persuasion. This site will include ideas and techniques about how to persuade through body language, presentation, and language. I will report on current research about empathy–which I believe is the basis for emotional connection and therefore persuasion–including my own research in the area that I am planning to conduct with Sara Konrath, Assistant Research Professor at the University of Michigan.

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It’s all in the eyes

Studies in cognitive neuroscience have shown that fear, surprise, happiness and other emotions trigger the amygdala in the brain based on the the amount of white in the eyes. While the orbitofrontal cortex and other parts of the brain decode complex facial expressions, the amygdala is quick and simple and responds based on just one thing--how much eye white is showing.

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  • upcoming seminars
  • using Aikido and Zen in your trial practice
  • a regular trial lawyers book club
  • his upcoming Trial Guides’ book

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